Tag Archives: science fiction

Kickstarter Campaign for Sci-Fi Magazine

kickstarter

 

What is Nonlocal Science Fiction?

Nonlocal Science Fiction is a quarterly digital magazine featuring short stories and serials from emerging science fiction authors from around the world. The first issue launches on March 14th!

 

Who is Nonlocal Science Fiction?

Nonlocal Science Fiction is published by 33rd Street Digital Press, a new independent digital publishing company owned and operated by Daniel J. Dombrowski.

 

What makes Nonlocal Science Fiction different?

Built from the ground up to function as a dynamic digital publication, Nonlocal partners with its authors directly and offers them a share of the profits from the sale of the magazine rather than a per-word rate that minimizes the value of a story submission.

Nonlocal involves its authors in a comprehensive digital marketing campaign which benefits the authors directly both by increasing sales and by giving independent authors valuable marketing knowledge and experience.

 

Why is Nonlocal Science Fiction doing a Kickstarter?

The Kickstarter will cover all costs to publish the first issue and help diffuse the expenses already incurred while organizing 33rd Street Digital Press.

More than that, the Kickstarter will help build a foundation of support for the magazine as supporters will become primary advocates. Every backer receives a copy of the magazine and has the chance to get limited edition merchandise and additional eBooks from authors appearing in Issue #1.

The top stretch goal for the magazine earns every backer a LIFETIME subscription to the magazine.

 

Is Dan available for interviews and guest posts?

YES! At any time, please feel free to email Dan (dan@thirtythirdstreet.com) to request an interview or a guest post about any topic you wish relating to the magazine or 33rd Street.

 

Anything else I should know?

After the launch of the first issue, all 10 authors appearing in the issue will be available for interviews! You will be receiving contact info for all authors and a complimentary copy of the first issue once it launches.

 

What are the relevant links?

33rd Street Digital Press website: http://thirtythirdstreet.com

Nonlocal Science Fiction website: http://nonlocalscifi.com

Kickstarter: http://kck.st/1KORMlN

Twitter: https://twitter.com/33rdStreetPress

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/33rdStreetPress

Story Summaries

All of these stories will appear in the first issue of Nonlocal Science Fiction.

Us and Everybody Else by Valery Amborski In the future, we’ll be able to escape, very literally, into our memories. But is it a good idea to live for the past?

 

Delivery to Venus by Robert Paul Blumenstein The Earth has become a ball of ice as the sun slowly burns out. A team of scientists must face the ultimate questions of existence while they sow seeds on Venus.

 

A Thin Atmosphere, Chapter 1 by Dan Colton Mars City comes under attack by tunnel-dwelling Rebels in the first chapter of this old-school space adventure serial.

 

Mazep-fal by Daniel J. Dombrowski A man who is both the youngest and oldest member of his tribe makes a terrible discovery on a pilgrimage to meet his gods.

 

Marigold’s Memory by Reva Russell English In a future where human memory is stored on microchip implants and bad memories can be erased, a young woman faces a terrible fate.

 

Catalyst by Aaron Hamilton A daring escape in a stolen spacecraft and a mysterious and alluring rescuer leave a smuggler wondering what will happen next.

 

Deal Gone Bad, Chapter 1 by Thad Kanupp Jack survives in a post-apocalyptic wasteland by scavenging guns and ammunition. His life is about to get a lot more interesting.

 

Shoot the Devil by Nicholas Rossis What would you do if you could travel back in time? If you had the devil in your sites, would you pull the trigger?

 

The Assistant Assistant Port Keeper by Jim Rudnick Life as an Assistant Assistant Port Keeper in a space port on the Rim has its highs and its lows. A visit from a particularly difficult species of traders presents an opportunity for both.

 

In The Days Of Still Pictures by H.C. Turk In an alternate wild west where cowboys ride zebras and elephants pull wagons, a pair of traveling salesmen appear and stir up trouble with their magical wares.

A few samples of what’s to come…

“In The Days Of Still Pictures” by H. C. Turk

At the desert’s edge, where dry heat created transient visions, sat the town of Vargo, Dakoda Territory, population low and unknown in the year 1873. Remarkable the newcomers passing through. Miners heading for the promised platinum out west just stopping for some drugs at the saloon. Damn herd of elephants ran right through the streets once. Really tore up the place. Your big city journalist seeking the “truth of the Amerigan frontier,” like a profundity misplaced.

Some people stayed for one reason or none, for one duration or another. The photographer, Mizzer Benjumin Roze, had been present a month, but not many people could afford his family portraits. A traveling salesman changed that, providing Mzr. Benjumin with a plenitude of business, an enterprise to unhinge this Erth frontier…

 

“Marigold’s Memory” by Reva Russell English

The second time she tried to have the chip unlocated, she went into cardiac arrest, her heart’s rhythm a high-pitched “eeeeeeeee” that showed itself on the monitor as a thin and serious line that stretched between the farthest cosmic reaches of an infinite point A and the farthest cosmic reaches of an infinite point B…

 

“Deal Gone Bad” by Thad Kanupp

I woke up with a scorpion on my face. It was crunchier than I prefer, but I’ve had worse breakfasts.

I crawled out of the scrub patch where I’d slept, tongue poking at the chitin stuck in my teeth. Dew had beaded across my skin overnight, and I was shivering. By noon I would trade it for sweat under the ruthless wasteland sun and be longing for the dripping bushes I’d hidden in for the night. That’s man for you. Want what you want ‘til you get it, and not a minute longer—one thing that held true for everyone. I needed it to…

 

“Catalyst” by Aaron Hamilton

Cribbs tried not to think of how lucky they had been, afraid he would somehow cause the scales to tip back against them. He hadn’t stopped to question it when his cell door slid open, or when his impounded ship was released from grav-lock, or even when they escaped without pursuit. But his cynicism resurfaced as his pulse slowed…

Book Review: Wild Concept By C.S. Boyack

Craig Boyack is one of those engaging people you just love to have around. He has a blog where he talks about real-life things like pruning peach trees and perusing county fairs for pumpkin beer as well as his fiction writing process. His muses stay in his writing cabin which he welcomes us into from time to time. Most of his muses are characters from his books, which he has for free over the 1st, 2nd and 3rd of December; Wild Concept, Panama, and Arson, respectively. I started with his first published: Wild Concept .

Book Review:

X2 is a prototype robot created by a company that makes automations, but X2 is so much more than the typical robot. With the capacity to have human emotions and life-like qualities, X2 becomes Lisa Burton. Lisa has more compassion and common sense than your average human. Lisa is extraordinary in every way. Both a sci-fi and a crime novel, with her unique capabilities and the understanding she is gaining about human behavior, she is sent to join the local P.D. and sets about with her partner to catch a serial killer.

Lisa is an excellent sleuth, but she is also one of the most colorful and endearing characters you will find in a fiction novel. In her effort to be a capable companion, as well as a top-notch robot, Lisa develops the sort of deep and meaningful friendships meant to last a lifetime, and Bunny makes me want to get a cute little rabbit of my very own.

Boyack has a character that has no backstory. There is no history to Lisa Burton, but Boyack takes this thing and breathes a fascinating life into it. Lisa has style, many of them actually, and the fashions she picks for herself echo her adaptive abilities. The supporting characters are as equally well-developed and seem as real as people you would know in real-life, each with their unique personalities and behaviors.

Either Boyack is brilliant or he has done his research…perhaps both, he has Lisa Burton engaged in some complex situations she works diligently to resolve. The novel has a few grammatical errors and a couple of typos, but nothing that impedes the read. The writing is reasonably tight with respect to the story line, but lack of scene breaks make it read more like a stream of consciousness novel style. This was a fun read and exciting adventure. It also offers some room for deep reflection on prejudice and what it means to be different. If you are looking for an entertaining read that will make you think about mankind’s journey beyond the natural, make you smile and make you cry, this is a neat little story to pick up.

4 of 5 Stars

Book Reviews: Catskinner’s Book and Cannibal Hearts by Misha Burnett

These are Volume One and Volume Two of The Book of Lost Doors sci-fi/urban fantasy series.

Volume One: Catskinner’s Book

5 Stars

I absolutely loved this story! The relationship of the main character(s), James and Catskinner, was psychologically fascinating as these two personalities were profoundly interesting. I could hear the distinctive voices of each in my head. The dialogue between them was well done, and contributed to the plot development.

The plot moved at a steady, quick pace with one intriguing adventure after another. As soon as you recovered from one incident another was put before you. The mechanics and descriptiveness of scenario was both plausible and fantastic.

Two things I thoroughly enjoyed about this book: 1) the accessibility of the writing style, and 2) the genius creativity and imagination expressed through the author’s imagery. I would highly recommend it if you are looking for a psychologically dynamic sci-fi/fantasy story.

Volume Two: Cannibal Hearts

4 stars

Of course, after being so very delighted with Burnett’s Catskinner’s Book, I had to read this one right away. I was initially mildly disappointed that Catskinner’s role seemed to take a back seat to James’, though I still found the story line most intriguing. It seemed that James, as narrator, ruminated more in this book. There was less of the dialogue between him and Catskinner and less of the quick paced action that I had enjoyed so much in the previous book.

As the story progressed, again, Burnett’s creative genius showed through and I found myself deeply involved and invested in discovery. Alien actually became comfortable. The unusual and colorful cast of characters was so well drawn that I feel as if I have a whole new set of friends, and enemies, in this book–even the weirdest. Be advised, I like weird. I will also add here, I loved the profound, original, and thought provoking quotes the author included under each chapter heading. I am eagerly anticipating the third in the series.

You can purchase these books here: Catskinner’s Book and Cannibal Hearts 

You can get to know Misha Burnett and learn more about his upcoming book, “The Worms of Heaven” here on his blog.

As a side note, 

I’m going to qualify regarding my science fiction reading. I cut my teeth on science fiction. Back in the seventies, as a young teen, my Grandma’s neighbor was a young man by the name of Michael Bishop. I spent some boring summer days in my Grandma’s small town, Pine Mountain, Georgia. The boredom was relieved by my visits to Mr. Bishop’s library.

Mr. Bishop was, still is, a science fiction writer and author of many books, including one (correction: three) for which he received the Nebula Award. He was also nominated for the Hugo Award. I did not read his works, because he had not yet published them, but he had inherited an enormous library from his father-in-law and it filled the turreted two-story library of his home. Many days I heard him clacking away at the typewriter through an open window in his library.

I would stop in to annoy visit with Mr. Bishop from time to time and was most impressed by both the library and his devotion to writing. Michael would loan me books from his library and send me away.

The books he loaned me were titles by authors such as Isaac Asimov, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. I loved being able to escape to fantastical other worlds. Asimov, with his background in biochemistry, and Le Guin, with her mix of fantasy and sci-fi kept me entertained for hours on end. I truly loved the sort of sci-fi they wrote. Mr. Bishop, who was also my Sunday school teacher upon a time, and I would review the books when I brought them back.

Then, in a young girl’s life, many years later, around the mid-eighties, something happened to the sci-fi that I ran across. It got so complex and outer-space oriented that you needed an astrophysics degree or an alien translator to follow plots or decipher difficult sentences and name structures. Names lost their vowels, and plots became so implausible that I lost interest totally in the genre. I began to read more straight up fantasy…witches and vampires, magic that professed to be magic, immortals, and such.

I never went back to sci-fi, and I said all of that to say this: Thank you, Misha Burnett, for bringing me back to earth with these fascinating and intriguing mixed genre sci-fi/fantasy tales!